Early childhood common core is harmful.

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Early childhood. This administration is funneling millions into controlling it. Once again, it’s “for our own good”. But at what cost? What happens to imaginative play, nurturing, and naps, under government and corporate led baby ed? Take a look at the critique of the early childhood fed led ed initiative. Testing for four year olds? For age three? Preposterous. Useless. Harmful.

http://sayanythingblog.com/entry/aimee-thiessen-preschooler-ready-work-force/

A statement was released from 500 childhood experts demanding common core be halted and screaming about it’s inappropriateness, especially for the younger set. It was ignored.

http://truthinamericaneducation.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/joint_statement_on_core_standards.pdf
…..We therefore call on the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers to suspend their current drafting of standards for children in kindergarten through grade three.
We further call for the creation of a consortium of early childhood researchers, developmental psychologists, pediatricians, cognitive scientists, master teachers, and school leaders to develop comprehensive guidelines for effective early care and teaching that recognize the right of every child to a healthy start in life and a developmentally appropriate education.

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The current trend is for all day Kindergarten, and soon that could be mandatory. All day Pre K is looked at as a gift in inner cities where daycare is too great an expense and parents are exhausted, and in need. But what price are the children paying for their financial need?

There is more information on the pitfalls of early childhood common core than could be included here, but here is a crash course. If you are a parent or teacher, it is imperative that you realize the dangerous path education is following when it comes to the youngest learners.

https://truthabouteducation.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/the-disturbing-transformation-of-kindergarten/

http://pushingthependulum.com/2015/01/13/common-kindergarten/.

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http://dianeravitch.net/2015/01/13/experts-eliminate-cc-kindergarten-standards/

“Experts in early childhood education are calling for the abandonment of Common Core standards in kindergarten and their replacement by developmentally appropriate, research-based practice.

Defending the Early Years (DEY), in conjunction with the Alliance for Childhood, released a new report “Reading Instruction in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose.”

Early childhood experts could find no solid research showing long-term educational gains for children who are taught to read in kindergarten, yet this is what the Common Core Standards require. The pressure of implementing the CC reading standard is leading many kindergarten teachers to resort to inappropriate drilling on specific skills and excessive testing. Teacher-led direct instruction in kindergarten has almost entirely replaced the active, play-based experiential learning that we know children need.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/01/13/report-requiring-kindergartners-to-read-as-common-core-does-may-harm-some/

“Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten, yet the Common Core State Standards require them to do just that. This is leading to inappropriate classroom practices.
No research documents long-term gains from learning to read in kindergarten.
Research shows greater gains from play-based programs than from preschools and kindergartens with a more academic focus.
Children learn through playful, hands-on experiences with materials, the natural world, and engaging, caring adults.
Active, play-based experiences in language-rich environments help children develop their ideas about symbols, oral language and the printed word — all vital components of reading.
We are setting unrealistic reading goals and frequently using inappropriate methods to accomplish them.
In play-based kindergartens and preschools, teachers intentionally design language and literacy experiences which help prepare children to become fluent readers.
The adoption of the Common Core State Standards falsely implies that having children achieve these standards will overcome the impact of poverty on development and learning, and will create equal educational opportunity for all children.
The report says that kindergarten has since the 1980s become increasingly academic — with big pushes from President George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and President Obama’s Race to the Top — and that today many children are being asked to do things they are not ready to do. It says:

Under the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) the snowball has escalated into an avalanche which threatens to destroy appropriate and effective approaches to early education. The kindergarten standards, in use in over 40 states, place huge emphasis on print literacy and state bluntly that, by the end of kindergarten, children are to “read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.” Large amounts of time and money are being devoted to this goal, and its impact is felt strongly in many preschools as well.

Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten. In addition, the pressure of implementing the standards leads many kindergarten teachers to resort to inappropriate didactic methods combined with frequent testing. Teacher-led instruction in kindergartens has almost entirely replaced the active, play-based, experiential learning that we know children need from decades of research in cognitive and developmental psychology and neuroscience.”

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/living-in-dialogue/2013/11/common_core_standards_ten_colo.html
“Error #2: The Common Core State Standards violate what we know about how children develop and grow.

One of the problems with the blinkered development process described above is that no experts on early childhood were included in the drafting or internal review of the Common Core.

In response to the Common Core, more than 500 experts signed the Joint Statement of Early Childhood Health and Education Professionals on the Common Core Standards Initiative. This statement now seems prophetic in light of what is happening in classrooms. The key concerns they raised were:

1. Such standards will lead to long hours of instruction in literacy and math.

2. They will lead to inappropriate standardized testing

3. Didactic instruction and testing will crowd out other important areas of learning.

4. There is little evidence that such standards for young children lead to later success.

Many states are now developing standards and tests for children in kindergarten, 1st grade, and 2nd grade, to “prepare” them for the Common Core. Early childhood education experts agree that this is developmentally inappropriate. Young children do not need to be subjected to standardized tests. Just recently, the parents of a k-2 school refused to allow their children to be tested. They were right to do so.”

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/opinion/abetteriowa/2014/11/26/common-core-early-childhood-education-testing/70113320/

“….The early childhood years are generally considered to be from birth even up to age 8. What we know about kids in that age range is that they are developmental learners. They learn new skills at their own pace. This means every skill is learned developmentally from rolling over to speaking to reading. Though we can do things to encourage children, no child can be forced to do any of these things before he is ready.

What we have done with the Common Core is insisted upon every child doing everything at the exact same time. Imagine if we decided that each child should be talking by 11 months and declared that they would not be ready for a career if that didn’t happen.

That is exactly what we are doing by trying to force children to meet arbitrary reading skills at certain times. Some will have met them before that mark, just as some learn to talk at nine months. Some won’t meet the reading skills when required, just as some babies won’t talk until 13 months. We know that they will still be just as successful talkers later in life no matter when they learned to do it.

So how does testing fit into early childhood education?

The answer: It doesn’t. We know that the early childhood years are a unique time in a child’s learning and therefore they can’t be tested as the “big kids” are.

How do we know when a child is a successful crawler? We don’t need an assessment to prove that learning. We can see that they are. In that same way, observation is the best method of assessment to be employed in an early childhood classroom. No two kids develop at the same rate, so no common test can be useful in measuring learning.

The problem is that we have lost trust in our professional educators and have come to believe that a test score is the only valid indicator of a child’s learning. That is simply wrong.

An early childhood teacher can tell all she needs to know by watching and listening. She can tell if a child understands concepts of print, if he needs more instruction in sight words or vowel sounds, blends or comprehension just by reading with him for a few minutes.

The tests being used do not imitate how young ones really read, and the scores that are generated by them are generally inaccurate.

Tests given to young children are nearly always written and given in an inappropriate way. There should never be a multiple choice question in front of a child until he is at least 8 years old. There should never be a test administered on a computer.

The time administering required tests has grown tremendously. This has stolen hours, and even days, of precious learning time from our children. The focus on improving these scores has caused the loss of recess time, art and music time and, most important, free play time.

All learning in the early years should be play-based and exploratory. Yet, many districts have now purchased and are using scripted programs that require seat work. These programs do not allow for the widely diverse needs of our little learners and instead insist that they all fit into a perfect box at a perfect time even if they are not ready for that or are already well beyond it.

These tests are given for only one reason, and that is to get them skilled at taking tests so that they will perform better in the years that follow.

Most parents don’t care if their 5-year-olds are great test takers, and they don’t want their child’s time wasted preparing them to be so. They care if their students are lovers of learning, if they are socially adjusted, if they are healthy and happy.

The constant judging, labeling and scoring can be detrimental. The effect on our kids ranges from boredom to extreme anxiety. We know from other test-centered countries that children will lose the ability to innovate and problem solve.

This is a real danger to our youngest students. There is only one way for this to stop.

Parents and teachers need to speak up. They need to tell administrators, school board members and politicians that they will not stand for this treatment of their children. They need to insist that superintendents bring in early childhood consultants to evaluate the programs. They need to insist on the right to opt their kids and students out of any unsuitable testing activities.

Our babies only get one shot at being little, and we can’t reverse the damage that is being done. The people imposing this on our children do not know how to teach young ones.

We need to send the loud and clear message that we do not want these instructional decisions being made by those who don’t know how to instruct beginning learners.”

http://truthinamericaneducation.com/common-core-state-standards/how-common-core-advocates-ignored-early-childhood-experts/

“….We know that most were not aware of five members of the Common Core validation committee not signing off, and I’m sure their dissent was glossed over. How do you ignore this?

The fact that Common Core advocates were warned about the developmental inappropriateness of the early childhood standards by experts in this field and they did nothing.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/how-ed-policy-is-hurting-early-childhood-education/2012/05/24/gJQAm0jZoU_blog.html

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“….Current policies support an over-emphasis on testing and assessment at the expense of all other aspects of early childhood education.

Already strapped for time and money, schools turn valuable attention and resources toward preparing teachers to administer and score tests and assessments rather than meet the needs of the whole child. As teachers strive to raise test scores, they increasingly depend on scripted curricula designed to teach what is on the tests. We know, however, that children learn best when skilled and responsive teachers observe them closely and provide curriculum tailored to meet each child’s needs. Standardized tests of any type do not have a place in early childhood education, and should not be used for making decisions about young children or their programs. Individualized assessments of each child’s abilities, interests and needs provide teachers with the information they require to individualize teaching and learning.”

http://dianeravitch.net/2012/08/25/is-common-core-developmentally-appropriate/

“…..Finding ways to stay developmentally appropriate, when many of the tests and assessments are not, is becoming increasingly difficult. And looking critically at the how, what, when and why of testing and assessments which have increased with RTTT, is important work for the early childhood community. If ever there was a time in the USA for early childhood educators to be looking closely at policy and debating the direction of early childhood education, now is the time. As the leading organization of early childhood educators, NAEYC should be at the forefront of advocating for young children – and speaking out against policies that aren’t grounded in what decades of research has proven: that children develop best — socially, emotionally and cognitively — when they have educational experiences that promote creativity, thinking and problem solving skills, and engage in meaningful activities geared to their developmental levels and needs.”

http://dianeravitch.net/2015/03/04/teacher-common-core-is-turning-first-grade-into-a-nightmare/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/03/23/kindergarten-teacher-my-job-is-now-about-tests-and-data-not-children-i-quit/

“…..Each year, I have been required to spend more time attending classes and workshops to learn about new academic demands that smack of 1st and 2nd grade, instead of kindergarten and PreK. I have needed to schedule and attend more and more meetings about increasingly extreme behaviors and emotional needs of children in my classroom; I recognize many of these behaviors as children shouting out to the adults in their world, “I can’t do this! Look at me! Know me! Help me! See me!” I have changed my practice over the years to allow the necessary time and focus for all the demands coming down from above. Each year there are more. Each year I have had less and less time to teach the children I love in the way I know best—and in the way child development experts recommend. I reached the place last year where I began to feel I was part of a broken system that was causing damage to those very children I was there to serve.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/01/29/a-tough-critique-of-common-core-on-early-childhood-education/

“….It appears that early childhood teachers and child development experts were excluded from the K-3 standards-writing process.
When the standards were first revealed in March 2010, many early childhood educators and researchers were shocked. “The people who wrote these standards do not appear to have any background in child development or early childhood education,” wrote Stephanie Feeney of the University of Hawaii, chair of the Advocacy Committee of the National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators.

The promoters of the standards claim they are based in research. They are not. There is no convincing research, for example, showing that certain skills or bits of knowledge (such as counting to 100 or being able to read a certain number of words) if mastered in kindergarten will lead to later success in school. Two recent studies show that direct instruction can actually limit young children’s learning. At best, the standards reflect guesswork, not cognitive or developmental science.”

http://nancyebailey.com/2015/01/02/investing-in-early-childhood-education-for-children-not-to-fix-the-economy/

“….While one can argue that portions of these quotes might imply good things for children, the real focus is on the economy and the nation, not so much the children.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/schooled/2014/11/06/teaching_pre_k_higher_standards_not_enough_training_and_the_importance_of.html?wpsrc=sh_all_dt_tw_top.

…..Bassok says that contemporary kindergarten teachers are far less likely to teach the basics through dramatic play, science areas, art areas, or sand tables set up in their classrooms, and they are far more likely to spend time on teacher-directed whole class activities, like lecturing and handing out worksheets.

Many parents, particularly those from low-income communities, have told me that they want their young children to have homework and worksheets from an early age because they believe it will help them get ahead. But, as Stanford professor Stipek says, young children learn best by doing. Stipek visited one pre-K classroom where the children were drilled in number recitations and could count to 10 from memory. But hands-on activities were less common. And when Stipek put some pennies down on a table and asked how many pennies there were, the children had no clue. They knew their numbers, but not what they meant.”

Also: http://nancyebailey.com/2015/01/13/are-todays-children-developmentally-different-from-children-in-the-past/

Common core is wrong for all students, teachers and families. But, it is most egregiously, shamefully harmful, for the youngest learners.

http://dianeravitch.net/2015/01/13/experts-eliminate-cc-kindergarten-standards/

“Experts in early childhood education are calling for the abandonment of Common Core standards in kindergarten and their replacement by developmentally appropriate, research-based practice.
Defending the Early Years (DEY), in conjunction with the Alliance for Childhood, released a new report “Reading Instruction in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose.”
Early childhood experts could find no solid research showing long-term educational gains for children who are taught to read in kindergarten, yet this is what the Common Core Standards require. The pressure of implementing the CC reading standard is leading many kindergarten teachers to resort to inappropriate drilling on specific skills and excessive testing. Teacher-led direct instruction in kindergarten has almost entirely replaced the active, play-based experiential learning that we know children need.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/01/13/report-requiring-kindergartners-to-read-as-common-core-does-may-harm-some/

“Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten, yet the Common Core State Standards require them to do just that. This is leading to inappropriate classroom practices.
No research documents long-term gains from learning to read in kindergarten.
Research shows greater gains from play-based programs than from preschools and kindergartens with a more academic focus.
Children learn through playful, hands-on experiences with materials, the natural world, and engaging, caring adults.
Active, play-based experiences in language-rich environments help children develop their ideas about symbols, oral language and the printed word — all vital components of reading.
We are setting unrealistic reading goals and frequently using inappropriate methods to accomplish them.
In play-based kindergartens and preschools, teachers intentionally design language and literacy experiences which help prepare children to become fluent readers.
The adoption of the Common Core State Standards falsely implies that having children achieve these standards will overcome the impact of poverty on development and learning, and will create equal educational opportunity for all children.
The report says that kindergarten has since the 1980s become increasingly academic — with big pushes from President George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and President Obama’s Race to the Top — and that today many children are being asked to do things they are not ready to do. It says:

Under the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) the snowball has escalated into an avalanche which threatens to destroy appropriate and effective approaches to early education. The kindergarten standards, in use in over 40 states, place huge emphasis on print literacy and state bluntly that, by the end of kindergarten, children are to “read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.” Large amounts of time and money are being devoted to this goal, and its impact is felt strongly in many preschools as well.

Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten. In addition, the pressure of implementing the standards leads many kindergarten teachers to resort to inappropriate didactic methods combined with frequent testing. Teacher-led instruction in kindergartens has almost entirely replaced the active, play-based, experiential learning that we know children need from decades of research in cognitive and developmental psychology and neuroscience.”

http://m.golocalprov.com/lifestyle/its-all-about-education-the-rise-in-kindergarten-readiness-testing

“…..Do we really want an early childhood classroom environment that is so focused on academic achievement that it puts undue stress on our children, causing them to act out? Should kindergarten teachers spend the first month or two of school giving assessments, rather than encouraging exploration, facilitating creative play, and guiding appropriate social interactions and pre-literacy behaviors?”

http://edlibertywatch.org/2014/12/federal-budget-moves-education-control-efforts-down-to-pre-k-with-race-to-the-top/

“….The bad news is that fed ed control machine is ramping up it efforts in the pre-K realm. $250 million from the Race to the Top will now be spent on preschool programs via the Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge grants and Preschool Development Grants for expansion to a total of 18 states with a total of $750 million more federal spending on early childhood programs”

http://wunc.org/post/common-core-it-developmentally-inappropriate

“You could say almost silly in the sense that they’re de-contextualized from children and even from understanding child development.”

Without that understanding, she says kids are expected to know things they simply aren’t ready for, which can make them feel “confused, scared or stupid.”

Sam Meisels, a childhood development expert at the University of Nebraska, describes those same scenarios. He has a problem with a kindergarten standard that requires students to read and understand emergent texts.

“It’s unrealistic to have an expectation about young children – all young children – being able to read,” he says.

Meisels points out that most third and fourth graders are even struggling to read.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/05/02/6-reasons-to-reject-common-core-k-3-standards-and-6-axioms-to-guide-policy/

“1. Many of the Kindergarten – 3rd Grade CCSS are developmentally inappropriate, and are not based on well-researched child development knowledge about how young children learn. 1, 2

The CCSS for young children were developed by mapping backwards from what is required at high school graduation to the early years. This has led to standards that:

list discrete skills, facts and knowledge that do not match how young children develop, think or learn;
require young children to learn facts and skills for which they are not ready;
are often taught by teacher-led, didactic instruction instead of the experiential, play-based activities and learning young children need; 1, 2, 12
devalue the whole child and the importance of social-emotional development, play, art, music, science and physical development.
An example of a developmentally inappropriate Common Core standard for kindergarten is one that requires children to “read emergent reader texts with purpose and understanding.” Many young children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten and there is no research to support teaching reading in kindergarten. There is no research showing long-term advantages to reading at 5 compared to reading at 6 or 7.”

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This note does not even begin to address the intensive amount of data mining for these babies. Collecting data on three and four and five year olds that will follow them through their lives. So very, very much is wrong and unacceptable about this aspect of common core. Yet “full steam ahead”!
Here is some verification of the data mining for even three year olds. Scared yet? Your child may not be potty trained yet, and that too could be recorded for later viewing.

http://www.doleta.gov/performance/workforcedatagrant09.cfm.

Must see:

http://s33d8070a884f0459.jimcontent.com/download/version/1388633831/module/8912110199/name/Common%20Core%20Language%20Arts%20Standards%20May%20be%20Harmful.pdf

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Announcing-New-Report-.html?soid=1109114069741&aid=if_jApi3_bw

http://reason.com/blog/2015/01/13/report-rips-common-core-for-imposing-sta

http://dianeravitch.net/2015/01/13/experts-eliminate-cc-kindergarten-standards/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2015/01/16/what-common-core-wants-kindergartners-to-do-read-write-do-geometry/.

https://theplainsatisfactions.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/prek-again/

Where is any form of democratic process that allowed this? Common core is at it’s base erroneous. But for early childhood, it’s downright criminal to allow it to continue. Parents and teachers, speak up. These babies are not getting their early years back. Don’t jump at full day kindergarten and especially not pre K. This is no gift. It’s educational poison.

What can parents do? Teachers?

http://deyproject.org/.

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/05/monday-musings-where-do-we-go-from-here/.

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